Quarter 2 Highlights 2018

The second quarter flew by as we examined the “Gift of the Nile” and made our way east through India and finished with China. Lastly, students created some amazing history for our very first ever Museum Day exhibiting the Ancient Wonders of the World. Egyptians raced up cataracts to earn Nile Points through presentations, quizzes, creations, and more presentations. I have thoroughly enjoyed observing the improvement of verbal skills in both classes this year. As they become more and more comfortable “on stage” the history we learn about becomes more real and less abstract. Thanks for learning alongside me and continuing to amaze with your creativity, problem-solving and cooperative skills.

 

 

Egyptian Pharaohs and their legacy in action!

 

 

The first of what will surely be many…Ancient Wonders of the World Museum Day was a smash! Students researched ancient wonders of the world and created placards to accompany a visual display. Next, students brainstormed ideas and formed a plan to bring their exhibits to life. I couldn’t be more proud of their efforts to make this first Ancient Wonders Museum Day so memorable. To complete this project, students fulfilled all of Ensworth’s core skills and mission statement goals and brought value to the community through an engaging display of the ancient wonders of the world. Enjoy!

 

 

Mr. Scott’s Wacky World of History Q1 Highlights

Inspired by Ms. Earhart in the lower school, I began a blog almost three years ago for my history classes.  Because I received such fantastic feedback, welcome to year four of Mr. Scott’s Wacky World of History blog. Here you will find just a snapshot of what you (the students) have accomplished the previous quarter.  Pictures, videos and a brief synopsis of content and skills will be the format. You should be proud of what you are able to create in such a short amount of time.

Without any further ado…let’s dive in the first edition of the 2018-2019 school year!

Our first unit of the year included studying the formation of civilizations. We learned about how man went from hunting and gathering to farming communities through the development of language and their ability to manipulate their environment.  In this unit, students were introduced to the QFT method of learning to ask better questions. Below is the method in full and then some pictures of our amazing students!

The RQI Question Formulation Technique

  • Produce your own questions
  • Improve your questions
  • Prioritize your questions

Produce your questions

4 essential rules for producing your own questions:

  • Ask as many questions as you can
  • Do not stop to discuss, judge or answer the questions.
  • Right down every question exactly as it is stated.
  • Change any statement into a question.

Improve your questions

Categorize the question is closed – or open-ended

  • Closed-ended questions: They can be answered with yes or no or with one word.
  • Open-ended questions: They require an explanation and cannot be answered with yes or no or with one word.

Find close-ended questions and mark them with a C.

The other questions must be open-ended so mark them with an O.
Name the value of each type of question:

  • The advantages and disadvantages of asking closed-ended questions.
  • The advantages and disadvantages of asking open-ended questions.

Change questions from one type to another:

  • Change closed-ended questions to open-ended.
  • Change open ended questions to close ended.

Prioritize the questions

Choose your three most important questions:

1.

2.

3.
Why did you choose these three as the most important?
Next Steps

How are you going to use your questions?

 

The QFT in action for Mesopotamia:

Mesopotamia: The Cradle of Civilization

 

 

 

 

 

In order for history to come to life, we engage in many simulations with the hope that the students will get a tangible and somewhat empathetic to help the words they read jump off the page. Below are snapshots of students learning the invaluable lesson about how advantageous it was for man to discover the ability to manipulate their environment rather than living a nomadic life of hunting and gathering.

The Hunter and Gatherer at work!  They never know what’s hit em’ when they enter Mr. Scott’s wacky world of history…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In our service learning unit put together by Hayley Brantley, students brought the problems of the ancient world into the 21st century by living out scenarios posing real threats to millions of people in this country who live in a food desert. The video below captures their experience.

 

 

 

 

As we closed out the 1st quarter, the Phoenicians, Babylonians, Hittites, and Persians were battling it out to see who would reign as the greatest Empire. Through a month-long simulation, students learned about the Fertile Crescent, what makes up a civilization and how they evolved throughout Mesopotamia. The question remained, who would have the most civilization points to reign as champion of the ancient world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

That wraps up edition #1 for the 2018-2019 school year. Hope you enjoyed. Next time we will see the Empires simulation in action. Until then…don’t forget to be awesome!

Welcome to 6th Grade World History 2018-2019–Parent Night Edition

I can’t wait to get to know your kiddos and explore history with them. Here is just a small sample of highlights to come this year as we track their progress through many experiential learning opportunities. Here are a few photos and clips of our first week together. Thank you for sharing them with me. I have already enjoyed my time with them and look forward to learning alongside them all year long.

The first few days we learned about each other through artifacts and storytelling. We also asked questions about the following prompt.

_QFT Focus–Civilization

 

Quarter 4 2018 (Year End Wrap Up)

 

May Madness resulted in a tremendous community-building event as efforts by those who weren’t even debating were celebrated. From civilization entrance dances to artistic flags, everyone contributed to widely successful 2018 tournament. Congratulations to both Grace Hasselbeck and Claire Gracey for coming out on top!

 

 

 

May Madness Overview

These past few weeks found students immersed in a tournament for the ages.  The annual May Madness Debate style tournament determining who had the greatest ancient civilization afforded students the opportunity to put all of their research/public speaking skills they’ve learned throughout the year on display.  Did it provide some anxiety, stress, late nights, anticipation, and even heartache?  YES.  Was there an overwhelming response after the last debate from the students that this was one of their favorite units of the year? YES! All this to say is at the end of the day, if I can hear students up and down the hall talking, arguing, debating about history, then I can sleep well this summer until we do it all again next year.

What a blessing it has been for me to have the opportunity to teach this amazing group of multi-talented students.  We have learned so much together. The journey has not always been easy…Is it supposed to be?  With that, I love Mr. Champion’s mantra of the power of “Yet” as this is such a powerful lesson for all of us no matter how old we are.  Embracing the idea that I might not have something “YET” is especially fitting for middle school students as they deal with so much change in their world. Mr. Scott’s world history students, thank you for allowing me to learn alongside you this year.  I am excited to see what your next chapter brings in this journey.

Below are moments of debate from the last week of our May Madness Unit–Finding the “Greatest Ancient Civilization!”

Civilizations put to the test to determine who was the greatest!

 

 

 

I thought it would be fitting to send you out with a reminder about what it takes to be a civilization–DJ Jazzy J style. Enjoy and make it a great summer by making history!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rome Exhibit Day 2018

Rome Exhibit Day 2018

Students were asked to create an exhibit for a museum about something that interested them about Rome. In this process, students brainstormed what interested them, created two rubrics (one for writing the museum placard and one for the exhibit itself), planned out their use of time in the MakerSpace and ultimately got to work putting the exhibit together. On March 28th the exhibits were put on display and can now be seen in the 6th-grade commons. Below is a quick trailer preview of their efforts.

The Greek Show!

The third quarter flew by and we accomplished much in World History.  Highlights include the National Geography Bee in which students put their World Geography knowledge to the test, the Greek Olympics, and beginning preparation for Roman museum exhibit day (coming up on March 28th).

To start off 2018, students immersed themselves in everything Greek.  In a competition to be the greatest Polis in all of Hellas, we debated, Kahooted, taken quizzes, drawn fate cards and even competed in the Greek Olympics.  Ask your child about the rise of democracy in Greece, the role of the Assembly, the birth of Theater, and how their architectural ingenuity still impacts the world today.  When you’re done with those questions, ask them to share with you which Polis (City State) they would have rather lived in, Athens or Sparta?  You will be blown away by their responses as they have critically debated this issue in a Harkness style discussion.

I can’t begin to tell you how proud them I have been in their transformation this year to really dig deeper into the material and critically think about the issues such as the role of government, economic impacts of trade and isolation, and how religion shapes the daily lives of people throughout the history of civilization.  Here are a few shots of them at work, dressed in their Chitons every day.

 

“Euge! Euge!” …the chant that could be heard as students debates social issues such as the citizenship of women, the freeing of slaves, and whether or not to give into the Persians.

 

Here is a snapshot of their initial presentations on their polis.

 

Students finished the unit in true Greek style by competing in the Olympic games over the course of two days. Events ranged from “The Great Philosopher” to “Chariot Racing.” The greatest joy for me was to the see the smiles on their faces as they cheered each other on. Zeus would be proud!

WELCOME TO MR. SCOTT’S WACKY WORLD OF HISTORY 2017-2018!

Inspired by Ms. Earhart in the lower school, I began a blog almost two years ago for my history classes.  Because I received such fantastic feedback, welcome to year three of Mr. Scott’s Wacky World of History blog. Here you will find just a snapshot of what you (the students) have accomplished the previous quarter.  Pictures, videos and a brief synopsis of content and skills will be the format. You should be proud of what you are able to create in such a short amount of time.

Without any further ado…let’s dive in the first edition of the 2017-2018 school year!

Our first unit of the year included studying the formation of civilizations. We learned about how man went from hunting and gathering to farming communities through the development of language and their ability to manipulate their environment.  In this unit, students were introduced to the QFT method of learning to ask better questions. Below is the method in full and then some pictures of our amazing students!

The RQI Question Formulation Technique

  • Produce your own questions
  • Improve your questions
  • Prioritize your questions

Produce your questions

4 essential rules for producing your own questions:

  • Ask as many questions as you can
  • Do not stop to discuss, judge or answer the questions.
  • Right down every question exactly as it is stated.
  • Change any statement into a question.

Improve your questions

Categorize the question is closed – or open-ended

  • Closed-ended questions: They can be answered with yes or no or with one word.
  • Open-ended questions: They require an explanation and cannot be answered with yes or no or with one word.

Find close-ended questions and mark them with a C.

The other questions must be open-ended so mark them with an O.
Name the value of each type of question:

  • The advantages and disadvantages of asking closed-ended questions.
  • The advantages and disadvantages of asking open-ended questions.

Change questions from one type to another:

  • Change closed-ended questions to open-ended.
  • Change open ended questions to close ended.

Prioritize the questions

Choose your three most important questions:

1.

2.

3.
Why did you choose these three as the most important?
Next Steps

How are you going to use your questions?

 

The QFT in action for Mesopotamia:

 

In order for history to come to life, we engage in many simulations with the hope that the students will get a tangible and somewhat empathetic to help the words they read jump off the page. Below are snapshots of students learning the invaluable lesson about how advantageous it was for man to discover the ability to manipulate their environment rather than living a nomadic life of hunting and gathering.

The Hunter and Gatherer at work!  They never know what’s hit em’ when they enter Mr. Scott’s wacky world of history…

 

 

The next challenge the students were faced with was to control the flooding of the Scott River. Forced to work together and solve the problem of floodwaters just as early civilizations in Mesopotamia managed to do successfully reemphasized the importance of establishing a government and developing technology.

 

 

In our service learning unit put together by Hayley Brantley, students brought the problems of the ancient world into the 21st century by living out scenarios posing real threats to millions of people in this country who live in a food desert. The video below captures their experience.

 

 

As we closed out the 1st quarter, the Phoenicians, Babylonians, Hittites, and Persians were battling it out to see who would reign as the greatest Empire. Through a month-long simulation, students learned about the Fertile Crescent, what makes up a civilization and how they evolved throughout Mesopotamia. The question remained, who would have the most civilization points to reign as champion of the ancient world.

 

 

That wraps up edition #1 for the 2017-2018 school year. Hope you enjoyed. Next time we will see the Empires simulation in action. Until then…don’t forget to be awesome!